Matching

The Meet Group Launches NextDate, A New Livestreaming Dating Game

Matching
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 256
NextDate Dating Game

If you’ve ever wanted to star in your own personal dating game, you’re in luck. The Meet Group has announced the launch of NextDate, a livestreaming dating game that lets users of MeetMe and Skout take on the role of a contestant in a speed dating show.

The patent-pending dating game offers a modern twist on a familiar format. As in a classic television dating competition, the user interacts with potential matches while being watched by an audience — except the user gets to choose who their matches are and, instead of a live studio audience, the game is watched in real-time via livestream. The Meet Group’s gamified take on speed dating allows streamers to add comments, use a rating system called the Love-o-meter, and take their romantic chances with any contestant who is currently playing NextDate.

Hinge CEO Justin McLeod Launches New Dating Lab 

Matching
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 144
Hinge CEO Justin McLeod
Hinge CEO Justin McLeod
Image: Hinge

Justin McLeod, the founder and CEO of dating app Hinge, has delved further into the mechanics of finding people their perfect match: this time, by launching a new dating lab.

Hinge differentiates itself from dating app Tinder, also one of Match Group’s dating apps - namely by helping people get off the app and into relationships. (Tinder on the other hand is always looking for app stickiness, recently by launching its own interactive series Swipe Night to attract younger users.) McLeod’s philosophy is different: he doesn’t use social media himself, and while he wants to provide a way for people to meet via his app, he also wants them to put their phones down and engage face-to-face.

New Study by Dating App Hinge Shows Similarities More Important Than “Opposites Attract”

Matching
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 159

A new study by dating app Hinge shows that people are more likely to match when they have certain traits in common, rather than the old adage “opposites attract.”

According to the results of the study, people are more likely to match when they share similar backgrounds, particularly religious affiliation, education, and even their initials. The study was conducted by Jon Levy and Moran Cerf of the Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management, and Devin Markell of Hinge. According to an article in Business Insider, they analyzed the outcomes of more than 421 million potential matches on the app to see how similarities in certain traits affected the likelihood of people matching. This included assessing indications of users wanting to communicate outside the dating app.

How Much User Data is Facebook Dating Collecting?

Matching
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 102
Facebook Dating User Data Privacy

Facebook Dating just launched, but privacy advocates are warning despite all the opt-in features, Facebook could be collecting more data than you realize.

Facebook Dating is reassuring potential customers by allowing them to make decisions about how visible they want to be on the app – including providing features to block certain users from appearing in your matches (like an ex) and hiding your dating profile from friends and work colleagues. Even some of the more questionable features – like “secret crush” – where you can identify someone you secretly like over the app, and if they do the same you two are matched, are only activated when users choose them.

Is Video The Future Of Digital Dating? Wingerly Is Betting On it

Matching
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 230
Wingerly Dating App

The word “transparency” gets thrown around frequently. We ask for transparency from governments, we ask for transparency from companies, we ask for transparency from our communities. On a personal level, transparency means openness, communication and accountability - being your true self and building relationships based on trust and authenticity.

Needless to say, online dating does not always live up to these high ideals. Photos are staged and edited to conceal perceived flaws. Profiles are carefully crafted to attract potential suitors. The problem of people creating false identities online to lure unsuspecting lovers is so prevalent that we’ve given it a name - catfishing - and an MTV show. It’s no wonder modern singles are so skeptical of each other.

Challengr App Encourages Users To ‘Swipe Less, Live More’

Matching
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 199
Challengr Logo

Ask singles what they don’t like about dating apps and the grievances come pouring in. Profiles are too shallow. Pictures are heavily filtered or edited. Swiping to match is too superficial. Messages are cut and pasted. Conversations rarely lead to a date. Ghosting.

Garrett Fritz, an MIT aerospace engineer who began his career building helicopter simulators, aims to address these complaints with a new dating platform. Challengr requires users to create and respond to ‘Challenges’ within the app in order to match. A Challenge is a text-based question, dare, or thought that you think represents yourself or your ideal match. It could be as simple as “What was the last podcast you listened to?” or as intense as “Show me a video of you bench pressing your bodyweight.”