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New Dating Platform S’More Prioritizes Personality Over Looks

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Adam Cohen-Aslatei, the former Managing Director of gay dating app Chappy, believes today’s singles are looking for “something more” than mindless swiping and superficial, appearance-focused dating platforms. That’s where S’More comes in. Cohen-Aslatei’s new dating app is designed to prioritize getting to know someone before deciding if you’re interested in them — and before you’ve even seen what they look like.

“Ten years ago, casual dating apps made it easy to find people nearby and the hook-up culture was born,” said Cohen-Aslatei. “Then came the second generation of dating apps with a lifestyles appeal, still for casual connections. However, most of the apps were still based on a ‘Hot or Not’ game, and while fun, left the majority of people hopelessly single. A reliance on dating the perfect selfie hasn’t worked, and today millenials are transitioning to relationships apps that focus on getting to know the whole person, which is critical when you’re looking for a relationship.”

Harvard Geneticist Aims to Build Controversial Dating App

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Harvard Geneticist George Church
Harvard Geneticist George Church

Harvard Geneticist George Church, known for his work on reversing aging, has now turned his efforts to building a dating app that eliminates diseases by matching partners based on DNA compatibility. It works like this: when two users have a low likelihood of passing diseases onto their children, they’ll be matched.

The move has drawn a lot of controversy, namely because of its nod towards eugenics, or “good birth,” an idea popularized under Nazi Germany in the 1930s to eliminate “bad genes” through selective breeding. Church however, argues that the goal is to eliminate disease by pairing people who have the least amount of risk of creating offspring with illnesses or disabilities.

Only Half of Tinder Users Have Actually Met a Match IRL, According to New Study

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Tinder Matches

Tinder claims to have made about 30 billion matches to date over its highly successful app (about 26 million per day, according to an article in The Daily Mail), but it seems only 50 percent of them ever meet one of their matches face-to-face. In order to increase their chances of meeting a date IRL, users have to match with far more people than they actually expect to meet, according to the study.

On average, when participants were asked how many matches they had actually met up with in real life, men averaged 1.9 partners and women 2.2 partners, despite matching with 111 and 124 respectively.

A team from Norwegian University of Science and Technology surveyed 269 students in Norway who were all Tinder users, and 60 percent of those surveyed were women.

The League Introduces New Video Speed Dating Feature

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Exclusive dating app The League has announced the launch of its newest feature: two-minute live video chats, intended to work like virtual speed dating.

The feature is called League Live, and users can opt in to participate, according to The Verge. It works like this: starting December 1st, the video dates will begin at 9:00pm on Sundays for those who have opted in, and the app will automatically pair a couple up based on their preferences and location as they do for matches.

The Meet Group Launches NextDate, A New Livestreaming Dating Game

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NextDate Dating Game

If you’ve ever wanted to star in your own personal dating game, you’re in luck. The Meet Group has announced the launch of NextDate, a livestreaming dating game that lets users of MeetMe and Skout take on the role of a contestant in a speed dating show.

The patent-pending dating game offers a modern twist on a familiar format. As in a classic television dating competition, the user interacts with potential matches while being watched by an audience — except the user gets to choose who their matches are and, instead of a live studio audience, the game is watched in real-time via livestream. The Meet Group’s gamified take on speed dating allows streamers to add comments, use a rating system called the Love-o-meter, and take their romantic chances with any contestant who is currently playing NextDate.

Hinge CEO Justin McLeod Launches New Dating Lab 

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Hinge CEO Justin McLeod
Hinge CEO Justin McLeod
Image: Hinge

Justin McLeod, the founder and CEO of dating app Hinge, has delved further into the mechanics of finding people their perfect match: this time, by launching a new dating lab.

Hinge differentiates itself from dating app Tinder, also one of Match Group’s dating apps - namely by helping people get off the app and into relationships. (Tinder on the other hand is always looking for app stickiness, recently by launching its own interactive series Swipe Night to attract younger users.) McLeod’s philosophy is different: he doesn’t use social media himself, and while he wants to provide a way for people to meet via his app, he also wants them to put their phones down and engage face-to-face.