New Study by Dating App Hinge Shows Similarities More Important Than “Opposites Attract”

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A new study by dating app Hinge shows that people are more likely to match when they have certain traits in common, rather than the old adage “opposites attract.”

According to the results of the study, people are more likely to match when they share similar backgrounds, particularly religious affiliation, education, and even their initials. The study was conducted by Jon Levy and Moran Cerf of the Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management, and Devin Markell of Hinge. According to an article in Business Insider, they analyzed the outcomes of more than 421 million potential matches on the app to see how similarities in certain traits affected the likelihood of people matching. This included assessing indications of users wanting to communicate outside the dating app.

Tinder Releases Trailer for Its New Series Swipe Night

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Tinder releases trailer for Swipe Night

In time for scary movie season, dating app Tinder has released the first official trailer for its original interactive series ‘Swipe Night.’ Tinder will release a new episode every Sunday beginning October 6th, with its fourth and final episode dropping October 27th.

The series will be accessed only over the Tinder app for now, and users will not only get to watch the series but will also play an active role as they make choices to see where the story leads. Swipe Night is about the apocalypse, with the central question being: how would you spend your last few hours on earth, and who would you spend them with?

New Study: How Much Do Americans Spend on Dating? 

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Spending on Dates Study

The average American spends over $120,000 over his or her lifetime on dating, according to a new study. Not surprisingly, seventy percent of daters think that dating is too expensive.

Online banking company Simple.com partnered with OnePoll to survey 2,000 Americans about their expenses when it comes to dating and found on average it costs people $168.17 per month. According to Fox News, they also discovered that dating expenses actually increase once the couple gets married – on average to $185.65 per month - because they want to do things to “keep the spark alive,” according to the report.

Match.com Responds To FTC Lawsuit And Fraud Allegations

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Match.com released an official statement regarding the Federal Trade Commission’s allegations that the dating service exposed consumers to the risk of fraud and engaged in other deceptive and unfair business practices.

In a lawsuit filed in the Northern District of Texas, the FTC alleges that Match used fake notifications to trick users into upgrading to premium subscriptions and that the company deceived consumers by failing to provide clear disclosures and cancellation practices. Match has denied the allegations, claiming that the issues pointed out by the FTC have “either been taken grossly out of context or permanently eliminated by Match.”

How Much User Data is Facebook Dating Collecting?

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Facebook Dating User Data Privacy

Facebook Dating just launched, but privacy advocates are warning despite all the opt-in features, Facebook could be collecting more data than you realize.

Facebook Dating is reassuring potential customers by allowing them to make decisions about how visible they want to be on the app – including providing features to block certain users from appearing in your matches (like an ex) and hiding your dating profile from friends and work colleagues. Even some of the more questionable features – like “secret crush” – where you can identify someone you secretly like over the app, and if they do the same you two are matched, are only activated when users choose them.

Tinder’s Latest Legal Entanglements: Trademark Infringement and Alleged Illegal Payoffs

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Near the end of September, Tinder had a litigious week. News of two legal matters - one new, one ongoing - that involve the dating platform and its parent company recently came to light.

Tinder has issued two complaints alleging trademark infringement to the startup dating app Wild. The complaints concern Wild’s original logo, which featured a mirror image of Tinder’s flame design in place of the dot over the ‘i’. Match Group, owner of the Tinder brand, sent an email to Wild demanding that the logo be changed:

"Your application uses, without authorization, the 'Flame Outline' design/logo, a trademark owned and controlled by Tinder, Inc… As we seek an amicable and swift resolution to this matter, we ask that your app immediately cease using any Tinder trademarks of any other name or mark which is likely to lead consumers to mistakenly believe its products or services are associated with Tinder or authorized by Tinder. If satisfactory modification is not made to address these violations, we ask that your application be removed from the platform."