Couples

Match.com Celebrates ‘Love With No Filter’

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We know we shouldn’t compare ourselves to what we see on social media. Everything, from the poreless skin to the sunsets over pristine beaches, is edited and carefully curated. But despite our better judgement, we can’t help feeling envious when we see travelers on picturesque getaways and fashion influencers posing in their flawlessly organized closets.

This compulsion to measure our real lives against the heavily filtered lives we see on social media now extends to our relationships. Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are littered with images of #couplegoals that make it easy to draw comparisons to our own relationships and give us unrealistic perceptions of love. According to a survey from Match.com, one third of couples feel their relationship is inadequate after scrolling through snaps of seemingly-perfect partners plastered across social media.

New Dating Study Reveals Everyone Wants A Partner Who’s Out Of Their League

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Online daters aim high when it comes to hooking up and finding love. According to a recent study published in Science Advances, both men and women aspire to date partners who are “out of their league.”

Researchers from the University of Michigan and the Santa Fe Institute analyzed heterosexual dating habits in four major U.S. cities – New York, Boston, Chicago and Seattle – using messaging data from a popular unnamed online dating service. The results of the study revealed that singles pursue partners who are, on average, 25% more desirable than themselves.

A person’s desirability was determined in part by the number of initial messages they received. The most popular individual in all four cities was a 30-year-old woman living in New York, who received 1504 messages during the period of observation, equivalent to one message every 30 minutes, day and night, for the full month of the study.

However, desirability is not just about the quantity of people contacting a user - the quality of people also matters. Those who receive messages from highly desirable people are presumably more desirable themselves. To account for this, the researchers looked at the aggregate desirability of those sending the initial messages using PageRank scores.

Ashley Madison Studies Reveal Partners Who Are Most Likely To Cheat

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Is your partner a doctor? A Libertarian? Obsessed with tattoos? If so, a series of surveys from married dating site Ashley Madison says they may be more likely to cheat.

As the world’s foremost experts in affairs, with more than 39 million users in 53 countries, the folks at Ashley Madison know a thing or two about infidelity. Several studies conducted by the company this year reveal the secrets of America’s cheaters, including who’s most likely to be unfaithful, what they’re attracted to when they do it, and which partners are most likely to forgive an adulterous indiscretion.

One survey determined the professions that are most likely to stray. The most common jobs for cheating women are in the medical field (nurses/doctors). “A combination of long hours of potential stress mixed with a natural reaction to stress just might be the reason these women in the medical profession seek out an affair,” reports Ashley Madison.

eHarmony Study Reveals 64% Of Americans Are Happy In Their Relationships

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The temptation to swear off dating gets stronger with every Ashley Madison hack, celebrity breakup, and creep exposed on Tinder - but according to new research from eHarmony, Americans are far from ready to throw in the towel and become cynical single curmudgeons.

The report, titled "The Happiness Index: Love and Relationships in America", reveals that 64% of Americans are “very happy” in their romantic relationships and just 19% say they're unhappy to some degree. eHarmony commissioned the report and it was conducted by Harris Interactive. 2,084 online interviews were conducted for the survey.

"At eHarmony, we talk a lot about happiness in relationships and how to keep them going strong," says Grant Langston, chief executive officer for eHarmony, in a statement. "We wanted to put society to the test and get a sense of how couples are living and loving in America today. Perhaps the most surprising finding is that gender and age dynamics in relationships are evolving, debunking misconceptions long held about both men and Millennials."

Research Indicates Online Dating Is Creating Stronger, More Diverse Marriages

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Online dating has been accused of ruining romance, fueling hook-up culture, spreading STDs, promoting superficiality, undermining marriage, eroding traditional values, and that’s just a scratch in the surface of the critiques levied against modern matchmaking.

But for all the complaining we’ve done - and likely will continue to do - about online dating, it’s not all doom and gloom. Recent research suggests the rise of digital dating services could be behind stronger marriages, more connections between people from different social circles, and an increase in interracial partnerships.

Economists Josue Ortega at the University of Essex and Philipp Hergovich at the University of Vienna in Austria set out to examine how today’s tech-savvy singles are changing society.

Facebook Data Reveals The Peak Seasons For Breakups

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Spring cleaning isn’t just for your home. According to Facebook data analysts, the season is also prime time for daters to “clear the clutter” in their love lives - in other words, it’s breakup season.

In a paper from 2014, Lars Backstrom of Facebook and Jon Kleinberg of Cornell University analyzed user data from Facebook in search of insight into modern love lives. Amongst other things, they found that:

  • About half of all Facebook relationships that have survived three months are likely to survive to four years or longer
  • Heterosexual couples are generally around the same age, even as they get older
  • Same-sex couples display the stereotypical age gap as they grow older, leveling off at about 4.5 years difference after age 38
  • How much interest couples have in each other is a better predictor of love than having a lot of friends in common