Studies

Stanford University Survey Finds Couples Who Meet Online Are More Diverse

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Couples who meet online are more Diverse

Researchers have long been fascinated by the ways online dating has changed how we meet and match. A Pew Research Center analysis of recently released survey data from Stanford University found that online daters are more likely to choose partners who are different from them in race or ethnicity, income level, education or political affiliation.

The Stanford survey, How Couples Meet and Stay Together 2017, collected answers from 3,510 U.S. adults who are currently married, currently in a relationship, or who have ever previously been in a relationship. Couples who met online were more likely to date someone with a different education level, political ideology or race/ethnicity than couples who met offline. The difference between those who met online and offline was particularly significant for political party and race/ethnicity.

eHarmony Releases Findings From First-Ever Singles & Desirability Study

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eHarmony’s inaugural Singles & Desirability Study

What do singles value most in potential partners? Is it humor? Generosity? Confidence? Intelligence? eHarmony’s inaugural Singles & Desirability Study, conducted in April 2019 by Harris Interactive, takes a deep dive into what Americans really want out of their dating lives.

The study found that both men and women want a partner who is kind, funny and honest. More than half of all singles said honesty is the most important attribute to consider when deciding who to date. Kindness (44%) and a sense of humor (34%) were named the second and third most desirable traits, respectively. While men were two times more likely than women to prioritize physical attraction, attractiveness ranked fourth overall.

Study: Nearly 40% Of American Couples Now Meet Online

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More Couples Meet Online

Look at the success of MTV’s Catfish, OkCupid’s omnipresent DTF advertising campaign, and the launch of Tinder-branded candles, and it’s clear online dating has become an indelible part of modern life. Dating platforms have changed the way we meet, the way we speak, the way we entertain ourselves and the way we perceive ourselves.

Recent research from sociologists Michael Rosenfeld and Sonia Hausen of Stanford University and Reuben Thomas of the University of New Mexico reveals the immense influence online dating now wields. According to the study, online dating has become the most popular way for heterosexual couples in the United States to meet. Data from 2009 showed that the percentage of heterosexual couples who met online rose from 0 percent in 1995 to about 22 percent in 2009. Today, that number is closer to 39 percent.

eHarmony Releases Annual ‘The Happiness Index: Love and Relationships in America’ Report

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2019 eHarmony Happiness Index

How in love are couples in America? What exactly makes a relationship thrive? For the second year running, eHarmony has released The Happiness Index: Love and Relationships in America to answer these questions and others. The national survey took place online between December 13, 2018 and January 3, 2019, with 2,327 interviews conducted by Harris Interactive.

eHarmony wastes no time announcing the good news: 83 percent of Americans are happy in their romantic relationships. Those who are blissfully paired up say the secret to their success is having a monogamous relationship with open communication, a healthy sex life, and an equal partnership between both halves. Only one in nine people say they are unhappy with their partner or spouse. These troubled couples are often together for companionship rather than love, have infrequent sex, and feel a sense of inequality in their relationship.

This year, a strong correlation between romantic happiness and an interest in social justice issues emerged. Couples who reported shared awareness of important cultural movements, such as #MeToo, also reported increased relationship happiness. Additional links emerged between relationship happiness and openness about mental health, honest political discourse, and voting in the 2018 midterm elections.

What Science Taught Us About Sex, Dating And Relationships In 2018

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Love is one of life’s most inscrutable experiences, but that hasn’t stopped scientists from trying to solve its mysteries. With each study that’s conducted, we get closer to understanding love, sex, dating, relationships and breakups - and knowledge, as they say, is power. Here are some of the insightful and interesting findings scientists shared about these topics in 2018.

People Aspire To Date Partners Who Are Out Of Their League

One of the year’s most viral studies revealed that the majority of singles who use online dating services tend to message people exactly 25 percent more desirable than they are. The study also found that singles switch up their messaging strategies based on their target’s desirability and that, though the odds of winning over a match who is out of your league may seem slim, it’s not a hopeless cause if you’re willing to make an effort.

Match.com Celebrates ‘Love With No Filter’

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Love with No Filter

We know we shouldn’t compare ourselves to what we see on social media. Everything, from the poreless skin to the sunsets over pristine beaches, is edited and carefully curated. But despite our better judgement, we can’t help feeling envious when we see travelers on picturesque getaways and fashion influencers posing in their flawlessly organized closets.

This compulsion to measure our real lives against the heavily filtered lives we see on social media now extends to our relationships. Twitter, Facebook and Instagram are littered with images of #couplegoals that make it easy to draw comparisons to our own relationships and give us unrealistic perceptions of love. According to a survey from Match.com, one third of couples feel their relationship is inadequate after scrolling through snaps of seemingly-perfect partners plastered across social media.