New Study Shows That Online Dating Matters if You Want to Find Love

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Think you can meet someone special without downloading a dating app? New research from UK’s luxury lingerie and swimwear retailer Figleaves shows that online dating is important if you want to find love.

January has been cited as “peak season” for those willing to try online dating. Match Group who own popular dating app Tinder expects a 63% increase in messages exchanged among its users. And many more singles will be joining dating apps and swiping left and right throughout the month, including those who have never downloaded a dating app before.

There are many myths out there about online dating, so we’ve decided to look to some statistics to separate fact from fiction. Here’s what recent studies have proven:

Myth: Online dating doesn’t work.

We’ve all heard horror stories of online dating along with tales of rejection. But what is the reality? We don’t often hear the positive results – the couples who met online and are happily together. According to Figleaves’ research, a whopping 46% of dating app users met their current partner online. So chances are you can meet someone special, whether you believe it or not.

Myth: Men don’t take online dating seriously.

Research from dating site Match has contradicted this many times in its annual Singles in America study, maintaining that men tend to fall in love more quickly and more often than women. And new research shows men are 4% more likely than women to fall in love and get married when meeting through an app.

Myth: The vast majority of people prefer to meet IRL, not online.

This is not the case, at least among younger daters. More than a third (36%) of users admitted they now lack confidence in their ability to strike up a conversation or meet people without the help of online dating apps. This goes for both men and women.

Fact: Online daters can be judgmental.

If you think photos matter, you’re right. Over 52% of online daters admitted that dating apps have made them more judgmental of people’s looks, pushing aesthetics higher in importance when deciding whether or not to swipe right.

Fact: Romance is out.

It used to be that two people locked eyes across a crowded room and fell in love. Not so much anymore. More people prefer to browse through their matches and decide whether or not to match before approaching someone in person.

Figleaves surveyed a sample of 1,033 people who use/have used a dating app. Research was carried out online by Censuswide in November 2017.