Match Introduces AskMatch, a One-On-One Phone Sessions With Professional Dating Coaches

Match.com
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AskMatch

Technology has made it easier than ever to connect with singles around the world, but it has introduced its own set of questions and complications to the dating process. Match’s new service, AskMatch, aims to help curious, confused and clueless users navigate online dating by making a team of dedicated dating coaches available for one-on-one phone sessions.

Unlike the AI chatbots found on other apps, AskMatch coaches are live humans with professional resumes. Members can consult these experts for guidance, actionable tips or a sympathetic ear by selecting the “Talk to a coach” option under the “Discover” tab of the app. After the phone call, members can choose to remain in contact with their coach through the app to ask further questions or provide progress updates.

“Our dating coaches are all about making dating personal again. In this tech-driven world, Match is focused on getting our members into real-world relationships, and that starts with investing in our relationship with our members,” said Match CEO Hesam Hosseini, in a statement announcing AskMatch. “This service is another way Match ensures our members have the best experience while they are dating—from saying hello to making a commitment—by offering an unbiased expert in their corner.”

Hosseini also told Business Insider that male users were three times as likely as women to use AskMatch during the beta test of the service in early 2019. He speculated that men may find the service particularly beneficial because “they struggle with opening up." If all goes well, Hosseini hopes a program like AskMatch could be a catalyst in making men feel more comfortable asking for help in their personal lives.

Match is not the first major dating brand to toy with the idea of offering professional assistance, but is the first to launch such a feature. Hosseini says it’s all part of Match’s mission to create real human connections that go beyond an app on your phone. But it is likely also a way for Match to differentiate itself in an increasingly crowded market, and to stay fresh when faced by competition from younger companies like Tinder and Bumble.

“We want to break out from behind the screen and get to know our members,” said Katie Wilson, Match’s Head Dating Coach, in a blog post about the new service. “We’ve heard it all, so we can offer you a supportive sounding board and straight-forward advice, no matter what you’re going through.”

AskMatch is launching in New York City first for free, with plans to roll out nationwide through 2020 if everything goes as planned (we assume for an additional cost). For more on this dating service you can check our our Match app review.